Beethoven’s Chords: A modern harmony songwriting perspective



Classic music can be thought of in terms of chords and chord progressions just like modern music! In this video we’ll be taking a look at a small bit out of Beethoven’s Sonata #8 (Pathetique) and break it down in terms of chords, progressions and chord voicings. Here is a great rendition of it by Daniel Barenboim, a fantastic pianist:

Although we’ll be focusing on a small part from the 1st movement, all three movements are fantastic and you should have a listen to all three.

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33 thoughts on “Beethoven’s Chords: A modern harmony songwriting perspective

  • March 10, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    This video was so simple and I could understand everything, so I was wondering if there's a video for this theme in the recapitulation.

  • March 10, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    ? the 1 4 5 1 still sounded the best of them all

  • March 10, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    Your speaking a language I understand!! Your lessons had help me appreciate Beethovens chord progressions here! Thank you!

  • March 10, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    Beautiful. Can you imagine the music beethoven could make with all the instruments and technology available today? It would be so incredible

  • March 10, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    At 2:54 you said B dominant 7.
    Maybe you wanted to say B flat dominant 7?
    But there is no Bb, so it looks to me a D diminished chord.

  • March 10, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    Thoroughly enjoyed this point of view… considering earlier pieces? A Brahms piece and/or Mozart concerto?
    Thanks.

  • March 10, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    That's exactly what I was looking for. Would love to hear more pieces broken down into chord progressions

  • March 10, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    Excellent video, playing and explaination.
    Some Beethoven chords progression's insight I was look for a long!
    Thanks

  • March 10, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    That minor V chord is interesting. I'm guessing it's just a borrowed chord? Or did it temporarily modulate to Bbm because of the secondary dominant that proceeded it? Anyways I'm totally borrowing it.

  • March 10, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    This is great. Are there any books out there, or more videos by you or others, that do the same thing for (lots of) other classical pieces? I can learn so much from this, and I don't understand why this isn't standard in the analysis of classical music. More Beethoven. Some Schubert, Mendelsohn, and Brahms

  • March 10, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    Really insightful. Thanks foe posting. It really helps to enjoy Bewthoven"s music writing even more.

  • March 10, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    MangoldProject…….ALWAYS A GREAT JOB!!!!

  • March 10, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    Dom7 VI chord sounds great and I will try to implement this, nice video!

  • March 10, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    Are you done this but with the Appassionata??

  • March 10, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    I find it hard to listen to classical music because I don't know what to listen to.

  • March 10, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    Noted LH RH counterpoint movement in B:s version.

  • March 10, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    Though I have tried lots and lots of lessons in youtube I always end up with yours… You are simply great. May God bless you for your kindness…

  • March 10, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    this was wonderful, i really hope you'll do more such analysis of classical music. It's doable to find jazz related analysis, but I still really love classical music and i'd love to learn more about how/why it worked so well.

  • March 10, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    Amazing! I just can't help but like all of your videos regarding classical music! But I'd especially like Chopin, it would be awesome! : )

  • March 10, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    Well, the "A7" chord actually sounds more like a sus chord for me.

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