TAXI’s Robin Frederick discusses Shortcuts to Hit Songwriting with Michael Laskow



Robin Frederick discusses “Shortcuts to Hit Songwriting: 126 Proven Techniques for Writing Songs That Sell” with TAXI CEO, Michael Laskow.

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20 thoughts on “TAXI’s Robin Frederick discusses Shortcuts to Hit Songwriting with Michael Laskow

  • February 5, 2021 at 2:00 am
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    It is like writing a report for my clients, they can visualize seeing what I witnessed on my investigation? Make them feel as if they are there with you. Never write a cold report of the story to tell? Thank you, I am going to order your book. I am a full-time private investigator and I have a music background. At the old age of 58, I graduated from Full Sail University with my Bachelors in Music Business. I am excited about your book and what you have to say. Thx John

  • February 5, 2021 at 2:00 am
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    I think her advice is pretty solid. Song writing is not something that comes natural for most people. Like any other art, songwriting takes a lot of practice, patience, trial and error, time, and the most important element of all is, creativity. ( having a way with words )

  • February 5, 2021 at 2:00 am
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    this is a good tip…

  • February 5, 2021 at 2:00 am
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    She just explained the Sister Mary Elizabeth Rule of Songwriting: Show before you tell. 

  • February 5, 2021 at 2:00 am
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    As they say, "Don't let the truth get in the way of a good story." Write what you know, but rewrite what they'll listen to.

  • February 5, 2021 at 2:00 am
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    If only I could write POS songs and clear sales of 4 million units the first year, I'd be a happy SOB. 🙂

  • February 5, 2021 at 2:00 am
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    Thank you how about my rough recording senior citizens? please kindly help.I am 64 years old composer of songs for the elders here philippines.I am the first ever composer of senior citizens song for the elders. I play music by ear only.

  • February 5, 2021 at 2:00 am
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    I miss your songwriting class! I hope things are going well! Watch out for a new pop song coming soon. I plan on purchasing your book on writing for TV and film. That has to be a great book! JD

  • February 5, 2021 at 2:00 am
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    I heartily disagree. The listener is free to internalize things like "I remember that night" to their own personal experiences. Specifications in the lyrics are not the same things as hooks. If any of this lyrical business is even noticed by the listener, the songwriter is already more than 50% there, as someone is already paying attention.

  • February 5, 2021 at 2:00 am
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    Yes, but unfortunately, there seems to be sooo much more mud to dig through.

  • February 5, 2021 at 2:00 am
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    I don't want to listen to half of these new musicians. Give me the old ones like MJ, Lennon and McCartney, Bacharic and Donny Osmond…lol I am exargerrating a little. Music shouldn't be discarded after a month or two. It is all controlled by the Ilumaniti anyways, music industry and media.

  • February 5, 2021 at 2:00 am
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    I've read her book and met her in person. Her advises make sense, but I would prefer something more creative then a re-write of "You've lost that loving feeling" and "Unchained melody"(awful title, BTW)

  • February 5, 2021 at 2:00 am
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    I'm with you on this one miroxp, no doubt. I think many agree, that is why underground music has become so popular. Unfortunately, the industry has already "brainwashed" so many.

  • February 5, 2021 at 2:00 am
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    this is what happens to you when you live in hype land, nothing. yeah that's right NOTHING!

  • February 5, 2021 at 2:00 am
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    I'm going to agree up to a point, which is that if you make the song too specific, the listener won't be able to insinuate their own attitudes and emotions into it. When I hear "She's In Love With The Boy," I think it's a nice story, but it's got nothing to do with me because it's too specific. When I hear "Wide Open Spaces," I love the song because it invites identification with seeking freedom.

    "The Gambler" has specifics *and* an overall theme, but it needed Rogers to make it a hit.

  • February 5, 2021 at 2:00 am
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    Take it to every church you know, and if it's good, it will find its way.

    Make a video and post it on YouTube. Don't worry about copyright; you're protected by digital production. Or copyright it if you prefer, you can find info on how to do that online.

    Best of luck.

  • February 5, 2021 at 2:00 am
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    I'm a christian songwriter…how do I get my music out to people?

    Music is more of blessing when you share it with people.

  • February 5, 2021 at 2:00 am
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    This is great advice. I wonder, though, where the balance is between giving enough detail that the listener understands the story being told but not giving so many details and specifics that it alienates listeners because they can't relate. I've heard from other songwriting classes that there is some benefit to writing with common and relatable emotions but general enough that everyone thinks you're writing the song for THEIR specific circumstance. Does she talk about this somewhere? Thanks!

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